Latest Publications

Description Category Date Author
The New Zealand Structural Steelwork Specification in Compliance with AS/NZS 5131: Key Elements to Managing the Compliance of Fabricated Structural Steelwork

The Structural Steelwork – Fabrication and Erection standard AS/NZS 5131 (SA/SNZ, 2016c), is cited as an acceptable standard for demonstrating compliance with the Building Code. This standard published in 2016, was developed in respo...

FAB2001.pdf
Fabrication 18/02/2019 Alistair Fussell, Kevin Cowie, Michail Karpenko
Practice Note on the Sourcing of Compliant High Strength Structural Bolts

The New Zealand Steel Structures Standard states that high strength structural bolts shall be supplied to AS/NZS 1252.  This standard underwent a major revision and was published on 23rd December 2016. The major technical changes incor...

MAT1010.pdf
Materials 20/03/2018 Kevin Cowie, Stephen Hicks, Raed El Sarraf
Practice Note on the Sourcing of Threaded Rod Used for Foundation Bolts

Threaded bars are commonly used in the structural engineering industry. It is used as replacement for long bolts as well as for concrete anchors and foundation bolts.  This product is not covered under New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 1252...

MAT1011.pdf
Materials 20/02/2018 Kevin Cowie, Alistair Fussell
Basis for and Implications of Key Changes to 2016 Structural Steel Product Standards

In April 2016, the suite of AS/NZS structural steel product standards were republished (AS/NZS 1163, 3678, 3679.1-2) (SA/NZS, 2016). This paper provides a summary of the key changes, the basis for these changes and interim recommendations u...

MAT1009 .pdf
Materials 01/03/2017 Alistair Fussell, Kevin Cowie, Stephen Hicks, Michail Karpenko
Checklist for Imported Structural Steelwork

The globalisation of the structural steel supply chain has sparked concern over the quality of fabricated steelwork in New Zealand building projects when sourced from low-cost countries. Demonstrating compliance of imported material with th...

QLT1002.pdf
Quality 28/06/2016 Alistair Fussell, Kevin Cowie, Dr Michail Karpenko, Dr Stephen Hicks
Ensuring Compliance of Structural Steelwork – Regardless of Origin

This article was first published in SESOC Journal Volume 29 No 1 April 2016. The globalisation of the structural steel supply chain has sparked concern over the quality of fabricated steelwork in New Zealand building projects when source...

QLT1001.pdf
Quality 28/06/2016 Alistair Fussell, Kevin Cowie, Dr Stephen Hicks, Dr Michail Karpenko
Welding to AS/NZS 1554.1 of Boron Containing Steel

Recent reports indicate that some imported steel may show elevated levels of boron; traditionally steel in Australia and New Zealand has been made without boron additions.  The welding requirements of AS/NZS 1554 have been established ...

WEL1003.pdf
Welding 02/05/2016 Dr Michail Karpenko, Dr Stephen Hicks, Alistair Fussell
Changes to specifying inorganic zinc silicates to AS/NZS 2312

Australian/ New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 2312 Guide to the protection of structural steel against atmospheric corrosion by the use of protective coatings provides guidelines for selection and specification of coating systems for co...

CTG1009.pdf
Coatings 29/04/2016 Kevin Cowie
AS/NZS 5131 – Why Another Fabrication and Erection Standard?

1.0 Introduction  In New Zealand we have the undesirable situation of an aged Structural Steel standard by international standards and we also have two sets of standards provisions that address the minimum requirements for the fabrica...

GEN2003.pdf
General 17/04/2016 Alistair Fussell; Dr Stephen Hicks; Dr Michail Karpenko
Paint Coating Selection and Specification: Changes to AS/NZS 2312

Australian/ New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 2312 Guide to the protection of structural steel against atmospheric corrosion by the use of protective coatings provides guidelines for selection and specification of coating systems for corrosion pr...

CTG1008.pdf
Coatings 23/02/2016 Kevin Cowie
Specifying Impact Toughness of Steel Plates for End Plate Connections in Seismic Lateral Resisting Frames

Structures designed to the Steel Structures Standard, NZS 3404, are required to be able to resist collapse under a maximum considered earthquake as directed by the Loadings Standard, NZS 1170.5. Brittle systems are not permitted. The nature...

MAT1008.pdf
Materials 27/02/2015 Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell
Bolted Column Splices with Minor Axis Bending

In multistory construction columns splices are provided for convenience of fabrication, transport and erection. If required the splices are located just above the floor level, which enables easy access to the joint.   There are two t...

CON3102.pdf
Connections 19/02/2015 Zahid Hamid; Kevin Cowie
Heat Input Limits of Welding Consumables for Earthquake Resisting Structures

The Steel Structures Standard, NZS 3404, references the AS/NZS 1554 suite of standards for compliance of welding consumables. NZS 3404 includes additional requirements limiting the heat input in the deposited weld metal for welds subject to...

WEL3001.pdf
Welding 24/04/2014 Alan McClintock; Kevin Cowie
Development and Research of Eccentrically Braced Frames with Replaceable Active Links

Ductile eccentrically braced frames designed in accordance with the New Zealand Steel Structures Standard, NZS 3404, provide life safety during a design level or greater earthquake; however, the eccentrically braced frame active link may su...

EQK1005.pdf
Earthquake 24/04/2014 Alistair Fussell; Kevin Cowie; Charles Clifton; Nandor Mago
Welding Consumables and Design of Welds

The Steel Structures Standard, NZS 3404, references the AS/NZS 1554 suite of standards for compliance of welding consumables. New editions of the AS/NZS 1554 suite of welding Standards have recently been published and these refer to newly ...

WEL1002.pdf
Welding 28/02/2014 Kevin Cowie; Alan McClintock
Specifying Steel for Seismic Lateral Resisting Frames

There are three common seismic frame types used in New Zealand. These are the eccentrically braced frame (EBF), concentrically braced frame (CBF) and moment resisting frame (MRF). See figure 1. All steel seismic-resisting systems are req...

MAT1007.pdf
Materials 27/02/2014 Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell
Web Side Plate Rotation Capacity

The Steel Construction New Zealand publication Steel Connect (SCNZ 14.1 and SCNZ 14.2) provides structural engineers with a rapid and cost-effective way to specify the majority of structural steelwork connections, in accordance with accepte...

CON1201.pdf
Connections 18/12/2013 Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell
Eccentrically Braced Frames Lateral Restraint of Link Bottom Flange

Eccentrically braced frames are required to be laterally restrained at both the top and bottom of the active link member ends to ensure reliable performance in a seismic event. There are occasions when direct lateral restraint to the botto...

EQK1009.pdf
Earthquake 18/12/2013 Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell; Charles Clifton
Design of the Linked Column Frame Structural System - A New Zealand Application

The Link Column Frame (LCF) system is a brace free hybrid system combining proven seismic load resisting technology; eccentrically braced frames (EBF) with removable links and moment resisting frames (MRF). It was developed to meet the requ...

EQK1010.pdf
Earthquake 04/06/2013 Alistair Fussell, Peter Dusicka, Charles Clifton, Martin Wong
Composite Steel Beam Behaviour with Precast Rib Flooring

Floors consisting of precast ribs supported on structural steel beams and in situ structural topping are a common form of composite floor construction. In this article guidance is given on the modifications required to previously published ...

CMP1002rev1.pdf
Composite 14/05/2013 Kevin Cowie, Stephen Hicks, Alistair Fussell
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Durability of Attachments to Glass-Fibre Reinforced Concrete Panels

Written by Kevin Cowie on November 7th, 2008.      0 comments

Glass-fibre reinforce concrete (GRC) panels are a versatile and lightweight façade system. Various surface colours and textures are available, making GRC adaptable to numerous architectural applications. They can be designed with a face mix to achieve an appearance very similar to that of precast concrete panels. GRC and other lightweight systems are beneficial because they are easy to erect and generally do not require heavy steel structural support in the primary building structure and also result in reduced foundation requirements. For these reasons GRC and other lightweight systems often result in more economical steel frames.
Topics: Coating Coatings
 

Suspended Slabs Level Tolerances

Written by Kevin Cowie; Clark Hyland on November 7th, 2008.      0 comments

There are two issues to consider when specifying floor finish: flatness and levelness. Figure 1 illustrates the differences. This article considers levelness tolerances. Steel Advisor article CMP1004 discusses flatness tolerances...
Topics: Coating Composite
 

Suspended Slabs Flatness Tolerances

Written by Kevin Cowie; Clark Hyland on November 7th, 2008.      0 comments

The tolerance limits in NZS 3114 have proved to be problematic for flooring contractors. Actual practice has shown that the current New Zealand standards for concrete surface finish tolerances for suspended slabs are not achievable. This article considers what the current New Zealand standards for surface finish are and suggests what tolerances can be reasonably achieved. An alternative method of measuring surface finish tolerance is discussed which may offer a better alternative to the current tolerance provisions.
 

Durability of Composite Decks Exposed to Surface Water

Written by Kevin Cowie; Clark Hyland on November 7th, 2008.      0 comments

Composite metal decking systems can be designed to satisfy durability requirements for a 50 year design life by ensuring that flexural crack widths, concrete strength and covers stay within the limits set in the Concrete Structures Standard NZS3101. This article illustrates the use of these code provisions by the way of two examples for the control of cracking due to direct flexure at internal slab supports.
Topics: Coating Composite
 
   
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