Latest Publications

Description Category Date Author
Design Example - Column in Simple Construction

It is common and cost effective to separate the building gravity only steel structure from seismic/wind lateral bracing frames. The gravity structure can then be designed as simple construction in accordance with NZS 3404 Steel Structures ...

MEM8001.pdf
Member Design 15/02/2012 Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell
Design Example - Column in Simple Construction

It is common and cost effective to separate the building gravity only steel structure from seismic/wind lateral bracing frames. The gravity structure can then be designed as simple construction in accordance with NZS 3404 Steel Structures ...

MEM6101.pdf
Member Design 15/02/2012 Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell
Design of Angle Trusses

Angle sections are commonly used as members in light weight triangulated structures such as trusses and towers. The attraction of angle section is their ease of fabrication, they are however more complex to design than other types of struct...

MEM6301.pdf
Member Design 26/08/2011 Alistair Fussell
Welded I Sections Seismic Category Classification

All steel members which form part of a seismic resisting frame are classified into one of 4 categories for the purpose of seismic design. Category 1 members are capable of sustaining high displacement ductility demands. Category 2 members a...

MEM1002.pdf
Member Design 22/12/2009 Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell
Hot Rolled I Sections Seismic Category Classification

All steel members which form part of a seismic resisting frame are classified into one of 4 categories for the purpose of seismic design. Category 1 members are capable of sustaining high displacement ductility demands. Category 2 members a...

MEM1001.pdf
Member Design 22/12/2009 Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell
Lateral Restraint of Yielding Regions in Columns and Beams in Multi-Storey Buildings

This article provides general guidance on applying the lateral restraint provisions for yielding regions given in Clause 12.6.2 of NZS3404 (SNZ, 2007) to columns and beams of multi-storey buildings. It includes simplification of those provi...

MEM2001.pdf
Member Design 16/12/2009 Charles Clifton
Deep Rafter Stability

The New Zealand Steel Structures Standard (SNZ, 1997), in keeping with many international design standards has no minimum stiffness requirement for restraints systems preventing flexural-torsional buckling of steel sections bent about their...

MEM3601.pdf
Member Design 17/03/2009 Allistair Fussel
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Design Example - Column in Simple Construction

Written by Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell on February 15th, 2012.      0 comments

It is common and cost effective to separate the building gravity only steel structure from seismic/wind lateral bracing frames. The gravity structure can then be designed as simple construction in accordance with NZS 3404 Steel Structures Standard. In simple construction the bending members may be assumed to have their ends connected for shear only and to be free to rotate. Examples of such connections are shown in figure 1. In beams and column frames for which simple construction is assumed, there will none the less be bending moments acting on the columns which are caused by eccentricity of the beam reactions.
Topics: Coating Member Design
 

Design Example - Column in Simple Construction

Written by Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell on February 15th, 2012.      0 comments

It is common and cost effective to separate the building gravity only steel structure from seismic/wind lateral bracing frames. The gravity structure can then be designed as simple construction in accordance with NZS 3404 Steel Structures Standard. In simple construction the bending members may be assumed to have their ends connected for shear only and to be free to rotate. Examples of such connections are shown in figure 1. In beams and column frames for which simple construction is assumed, there will none the less be bending moments acting on the columns which are caused by eccentricity of the beam reactions.
Topics: Coating Member Design
 

Design of Angle Trusses

Written by Alistair Fussell on August 26th, 2011.      0 comments

Angle sections are commonly used as members in light weight triangulated structures such as trusses and towers. The attraction of angle section is their ease of fabrication, they are however more complex to design than other types of structural sections. The reasons for this is the eccentricity of the common forms of end connections (figure 1) and also because the principal axes of a single angle do not coincide with the axis of the frame or truss of which the angle is a part (Temple et al, 1995).
Topics: Coating Member Design
 

Welded I Sections Seismic Category Classification

Written by Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell on December 22nd, 2009.      0 comments

All steel members which form part of a seismic resisting frame are classified into one of 4 categories for the purpose of seismic design. Category 1 members are capable of sustaining high displacement ductility demands. Category 2 members are capable of sustaining low ductility demands. Category 3 members are capable of developing their nominal section capacity where required to in bending. Category 4 members need not be designed to sustain any displacement ductility demand. Limits are placed on member section geometry for the various categories and this is found in section 12.5 of the Steel Structures Standard (SNZ, 2007). Previous tables have been developed classifying I section members into the appropriate categories (Feeney, 1993). These tables were developed based on the 1992 version of the Steel Structures Standard . Hot rolled steel sections classified were grades 250 and 350. Welded sections classified were limited to WB and WC sections. This article updates the Member ductility category of I sections for seismic design tables for Grade 300 welded sections in accordance with the latest Steel Structures Standard (SNZ, 2007).
Topics: Coating Member Design
 

Hot Rolled I Sections Seismic Category Classification

Written by Kevin Cowie; Alistair Fussell on December 22nd, 2009.      0 comments

All steel members which form part of a seismic resisting frame are classified into one of 4 categories for the purpose of seismic design. Category 1 members are capable of sustaining high displacement ductility demands. Category 2 members are capable of sustaining low ductility demands. Category 3 members are capable of developing their nominal section capacity where required to in bending. Category 4 members need not be designed to sustain any displacement ductility demand. Limits are placed on member section geometry for the various categories and this is found in section 12.5 of the Steel Structures Standard (SNZ, 2007). Previous tables have been developed classifying I section members into the appropriate categories (Feeney, 1993). These tables were developed based on the 1992 version of the Steel Structures Standard . Hot rolled steel sections classified were grades 250 and 350. Welded sections classified were limited to WB and WC sections. This article updates the Member ductility category of I sections for seismic design tables for Grade 300 hot rolled sections in accordance with the latest Steel Structures Standard (SNZ, 2007).
Topics: Coating Member Design
 

Lateral Restraint of Yielding Regions in Columns and Beams in Multi-Storey Buildings

Written by Charles Clifton on December 16th, 2009.      0 comments

This article provides general guidance on applying the lateral restraint provisions for yielding regions given in Clause 12.6.2 of NZS3404 (SNZ, 2007) to columns and beams of multi-storey buildings. It includes simplification of those provisions which can be made when designing these types of member.
Topics: Coating Member Design
 

Deep Rafter Stability

Written by Allistair Fussel on March 17th, 2009.      0 comments

The New Zealand Steel Structures Standard (SNZ, 1997), in keeping with many international design standards has no minimum stiffness requirement for restraints systems preventing flexural-torsional buckling of steel sections bent about their major axis. To account for restraint system flexibility, NZS3404 categorises these systems as providing full or partial restraint. In the commentary to the Steel Structures Standard guidance is provided for roof rafters for the minimum ratio of purlin depth to rafter depth to ensure a lateral restraint system fully restrains the section. No such guidance is provided to allow designers to check that the restraining system is sufficiently rigid to provide at least partial restraint. This is particularly relevant for the bottom critical flanges of deep roof rafters restrained by a flexible tension side system in conjunction with full depth stiffeners (Figure 2). In this paper guidance is provided for structural engineers to help them address this situation.
Topics: Coating Member Design
 
   
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